A Passion in Porcelain

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    Tom Turner: A Passion in Porcelain
    A Fifty-Two Year Retrospective (The Bascom - 2014)

    2001-2002-PEACHBLOW POTTERY

    Work continued as did clay body tests. I would sometimes have a friend fire the tests in salt or wood as I did not have those kilns. All of my work was fired to cone 9 down, 10 at 2 or 3, even the later electric kiln porcelains that will come up later. In 2002 I returned to porcelain realizing that I was a “Porcelain Potter”.

    2002-2003- PEACHBLOW POTTERY

    Back to porcelain and striving “for better”.

    CHEMICALLY REDUCED COPPER RED OXBLOOD AND FLAMBE’-2003-TURNER LANE- MARS HILL, NC

    Once the crystalline glazes were working I embarked on a chemically reduced copper red. Baggs had done some work at Ohio State University back in the 30’s, but I never pursued it because I always fired gas. BUT, what I tried to do in the mid 90’s with reds and crystals in reduction, I was now able to do really well in the electric kiln. I read everything I could find and began testing.

    2004- AND THE END OF PEACHBLOW POTTERY FOR ME

    2006 TURNER LANE- MARS HILL, NC

    FROM PEACHBLOW POTTERY TO NORTH CAROLINA IN 2005

    Shutting down, packing, and moving usually takes 3 to 4 months. I moved in April of 2005 and once I got to NC it took months to find a suitable place to start over again. There were no pots made in 2005. I did make my first DVD set which is a Two Day Workshop on 4 discs, and about 6 hours of watching.  I bought property near Mars Hill, NC, 20 minutes north of Asheville, was able to name my road Turner Lane, and proceeded to create another studio. All pots made in that studio has a Turner Lane stamp along with my stamp and date.

    My 4 disc DVD set sells for $60.00 shipped within the United States.

    FROM PEACHBLOW POTTERY TO NORTH CAROLINA IN 2005

    $60.00

    1 in stock

    2006-2007 TURNER LANE MARS HILL, NC

    2008-2009 TURNER LANE-MARS HILL, NC

    2010 OIL SPOT GLAZES TURNER LANE- MARS HILL, NC-NEW “TURNER’S BEST PORCELAIN”

    A year or so earlier I formulated a new porcelain because Georgia Kaolin stopped making Kaopaque-20. So I went to the English Kaolin Company and ran tests on their kaolins. I chose their Super Standard kaolin, their most expensive, but their whitest and most plastic kaolin. I had Standard Ceramics in Pittsburg make it and sell it and I called it “Turner’s Best Porcelain”, because it was so much better than my old porcelain. It’s their #600 porcelain. It throws better than any other porcelain I have tried and it is whiter and more translucent, even in oxidation.

    2010- ELECTRIC FIRING FOR OILS SPOT, CRYSTALS, AND COPPER RED

    In 2010 I had L&L Electric Kilns build me a kiln for my oxidation research. I had realized that Oil Spot glazes preferred oxidation over reduction and for the first time in my career I started firing electric oxidation. Any high iron glaze is going to boil during firing. They usually settle back down and we don’t realize they were boiling until we put a more viscous glaze over them that records the boiling-hence OIL SPOT. There are some non iron glazes that boil also like John Neely’s “Sea Slug White”, a Nuka/Chun type glaze. So I tested every high iron glaze I could find and ran 100’s of tests and combinations to the max.  I would make 25 pounds of test tiles at a time.

    2011-FROM THE OIL SPOT GLAZES I PURSUED A NON RUNNING ZINC CRYSTAL GLAZE

    Paul Geil asked me to trouble shoot a new front loading electric kiln and it was marvelous! It was later marketed by Skutt but was engineered and built by Geil. Skutt and Geil used me in photos to advertise the kiln.

    2012-2013-THE LAST POTS IN THE SHOW MADE IN 2012 AND 2013

    These are all electric kiln oxidation fired.

    2012-2013-TURNER LANE, MARS HILL, NC- OILSPOTS, COPPER REDS, FLAMBE’S, AND ZINC CRYSTALS.

    I’ve added extra photos of pots not in the Retrospective Show to show results of research.

    2012-2013, CHEMICALLY REDUCED COPPER RED OXBLOOD-TURNER LANE-MARS HILL,NC

    The Oilspot Glazes, Zinc Crystalline Glazes, and the Chemiccaly Reduced Copper Red Glazes were all fired together in the Geil front loading kiln to cone 9 down and cone 10 at 2 or 3. I was able to combine the Copper Red with the Crystalline glazes and the Copper Red with the Oilspot glazes, plus other glazes, all in one firing. Firing schedule on previous post.

    2012-TURNER LANE-MARS HILL, NC NON RUNNING ZINC CRYSTALLINE GLAZE

    Here is my article in Ceramics/Technical- No.35, 2012-“Chemically Reduced Copper Reds in Oxidation”-by Ceramics Art & Perception Magazine.

    MID 90’s BRINGS MORE CHANGE

    Due to various frustrations in the mid 90’s I stopped making pots and tried to get a full time job so as to have a paycheck and benefits. I learned then that a white male over 50 wasn’t about to get much of a job. I worked at a Hardware store in Deleware, Ohio for a wonderful friend Andy Anderson. I was active in Benchrest Shooting, which is a proving ground for accuracy. Having worked at Hansen’s Body Shop in Morris, Illinois as a teenager, i agreed to try to paint a stock for my gunsmith at the time. I ended up painting carbon fiber stocks with Custom Car Paint for about 2 years. I designed a couple of cartridges and I wrote a couple of articles for gun magazines and got 2 covers.(only the product had changed).That dimmed and I went to work at a Honda Car Plant in Ohio as a temporary. From there I went to a horse farm and eventually got back to clay in 2000.  I kept my last paint job, over 25 coats of primer and paint, almost like Japanese lacquer.

    MORE NON RUNNING ZINC CRYSTALLINE GLAZES-TURNER LANE- MARS HILL,NC

    NON RUNNING ZINC CRYSTALLINE GLAZES-TURNER LANE-MARS HILL, NC

    Retro Show NFS

    1 is a pot that taught me that Copper Red Oxblood glaze needs to be thick to maintain it’s color in the re-oxidation of cooling. This came out of the first salt firing white and I put it back in as a filler and to my surprise it got red. I started re-firing the salt glazed pots, each time building up more glaze. This piece was fired 2 or 3 times. There was no glaze or slip on this piece prior to the first firing, it went into the kiln as bare porcelain. The copper was with the salt-1973. Is in Studio Potter, Vol. 8, #1, 1979.

    2 is the Copper Red Vapor Glaze over blue porcelain yielding the Purple Vapor Salt Glaze. 1973

    3 is the epitome of the Copper Red Vapor research period with Copper Red Vapor Glaze over blue porcelain-1974. Kiln photos of before and after the firing.

    4 is a failed attempt at RED, but so very beautiful in it’s own right. Multi-fired and fumed for iridescence.

    5 and 6 are before and after photos of #3 in the kiln. NOTE the cones were always RED.

    Retro Show NFS

    1- The Copper Red Vapor firings had as much as 90% loss and I would occasionally do some stoneware and get 100% success for relief. This cover jar was fired in 1974. All of my salt glaze firings were single fired.

    2 is a slip cast beach ball with a thrown foot and made into a cover-jar. Glazes and slips provide exciting color. 1975

    3 is a 2 gallon stoneware Spouted Vessel made for an Invitational Show. Single fired salt glazed stoneware.

    4 is glazes and slips salt fired and fumed for iridescence. 1975.

    Retro Show NFS

    1 is another green glazed porcelain vase, glazed with Tesha from Leach’s book, and salt glazed. We used Tesha at Illinois State when I was an under graduate and it’s a high clay glaze rendering itself perfect for green glazing. I increased the iron to 18% and it salts beautifully.

    2.3.4.5 represent a period of transformation when in 1976 I resigned from Clemson as a tenured Assistant Professor in order to devote all of my time and energy to my ART. The large research kiln was made of AP Green Mizzou, 85% alumina, , one to resist the salt glazing and two if I decided to stop salting, I could fire glazes in the same kiln. IT WORKED PERFECTLY. 5 is a scrap glaze from dumping all salt glaze liners into one bucket. #4 is in Rick Berman’s book, “Teapots”, 1980.

    But since I had been relying upon THE FIRING for all of my visual surface affects, I now had to create surface affects prior to glazing. So I played with slip trailing, combing, and oxides over the glazes to create my decorative affect. It is at this time that I formulated my Georgia Kaolin Porcelain and started bisque firing again. Bisqueing allowed me to do things I couldn’t do green glazing.

    6,7, and 8 show the high alumina salt resistant kiln I built at my Liberty, SC studio about 1973.

    9 is a large Cover Jar that was in the first firing without salt added and shows a small amount of  residual salt glaze. It has the Tesha glaze and iron wash applied over the coggle wheel decoration prior to firing. It was in “35 Artists of the Southeast” at The High Museum of Art, Atlanta, 1976, and toured for 3 years.

    10 is a porcelain vase fluted with a potato peeler with my Temmoku in 1977. This is in “Studio Potter, vol. 6, #2, 1977.

    Retro Show NFS

    1 is a sectioned pot, with lid 3 pots coming together to make one larger Cover Jar. Iron wash over Temmoku, Turner Porcelain, cone 9, 10 at 2–1978 last of Liberty, SC firings.

    2 is a porcelain Dome Jar with Carlton Ball’s Iron Blue Choy glaze. 1980, Lake Mary, Florida studio.

    3 is a Spouted Vessel fluted with a potato peeler and slip trailed under my Celadon glaze.  Made in 1980 and In “Ceramics: A Potter’s Handbook”, Glenn Nelson, 5th edition, 1984

    4 is a Dome Jar with Copper Red Oxblood and glaze trailing over that-1981. Appeared in Ceramic’s Monthly, March, 1982 and also “Ceramics: A Potter’s Handbook, 5th edition”, 1984

    5 is a Copper Red that decided to come out a very nice grape colored maroonish color-1981. In “Ceramic Spectrum-first edition” by Robin Hopper.

    Retro Show NFS

    When I left the Liberty, SC studio in 1979, I dismantled the large salt kiln and took the outside insulating bricks to Lake Mary, Florida and built my first Car Kiln. I continued to mix and filter press my Georgia Kaolin Porcelain and was there only 3 years.

    1 IS A LARGE SECTIONED PORCELAIN COVER JAR, the jar made with two pots and the lid is a third pot. This was made at Lake Mary in 1981 and is in “American Crafts: A Source Book For The Home” by Kathleen Pearson, 1983.

    2 is a Spouted Vessel For Any Liquid with my Apple Wood Ash Glaze, and is in “Ceramica, ANO 5, Number 20, 1985, Spain.

    3 is a “Surprise Jar” where the pot has a closed small bowl area under the lid. Made at Lake Mary, Florida studio in 1982, it was was in “Functional Ceramics, 1983” at Wooster College, Ohio.

    4 is my first car kiln at Lake Mary, Florida.

    Retro Show NFS

    Lake Mary Florida was short lived and after 3 years I moved to Akron, Ohio on Medina Line Road. I had sold the Florida house, studio, and kiln to a potter so in Akron I bought all new material and rebuilt my car kiln in a 19th century Bank Barn..

    1 is what I called a Bi-Form, as it was made with two pots(Don Reitz influence), so this took 3 pots including the lid to make one pot. It has my Apple Ash glaze with extra ash sifted on before firing.1983

    2 is an even larger Bi-Form but this time a “Surprise Jar”, under the lid is a small bowl space. This has my Oak Ash glaze. 1983.

    3 is a Spouted Vessel For Any Liquid with sticker resist, glaze trailing, Apple Ash glaze, my Fake Ash glaze, with extra hand woven commercial handle. 1984 It is in Robin Hopper’s “Functional Pottery” first edition, 1984, and also in “Ceramic Review, January and February 1987”, England.

    4 IS MAYBE THE FINEST POT I EVER MADE, my ashes will go into this jar. It is the epitome of my “Sticker Resist” period, emulating the ware from the Song and Tang Dynasties, and as perfect as I was EVER capable of making. It is on the cover of “Ceramics Monthly, April1985”; the cover of my Retrospective catalog “Tom Turner: A Passion in Porcelain”; is in “Ceramic Review, January-February 1987”-England; in “Functional Pottery, first edition” by Robin Hopper 1984; and in “Ten Thousand Years of Pottery” by Emmanuel Cooper, 2000.

    5 is a subtle but strong “Turner” pot with Apple Ash glaze and Fake Ash glaze lightly sprayed over. 1984. It is on “Ceramic Review, January-February 1987”-England; “Functional Pottery” by Robin Hopper, 1984

    Retro Show NFS

    It turned out that Akron was short lived also, 1982-85, 3 years as in Florida, and I shut down and dismantled again and put everything in storage to take a breather and went to Tom White’s in Northfield, Massachusetts for the summer. At Tom’s I mixed some “Dirty Porcelain” mixing OM4, EPK, Custer, silica, and Jordan Stoneware, a bag of each in a bathtub with my feet. Not Tom’s house tub, but one outside his studio. (-; That Fall I was asked by Tom Malone to be a Visiting Artist at Illinois State University the winter spring term in 1986. There I continued the quest of “Dirty Porcelain”, or “Porcelaneous Stoneware”.

    1 was made at ISU, 1986, was supposed to be my bright Copper Red Oxblood, but with different clays, chemicals, and kilns I got this. Initially disappointed, I realized how special this was and kept it as a “Lesson Pot” for myself.

    2 is a Bottle Vase also made of dirty porcelain with my apple wood ash glaze. I like English pots with unglazed bottoms and pursued that too. The iron spots were added rust scale in the glaze.

    3 is one of the most beautiful pots I have ever made. Again the dirty porcelain, ash glaze, with extra ash sifted on the shoulder prior to firing. A “Woodfire Affect” without the labor.

    RETRO SHOW NFS-PEACHBLOW POTTERY 1986-2005

    RETRO SHOW NFS-PEACHBLOW POTTERY

    In the mid 90’s I was trying to combine Copper Red Oxblood with Zinc/Lithium Crystals in my normal reduction firing, only to learn that the crystals don’t like reduction. As with all of my endeavors, loss was high. It would be 15 years before I brought them together in electric oxidation firings.

    RETROSPECTIVE CATALOG-TOM TURNER: A PASSION FOR PORCELAIN-2014

    This is a 106 page, full color catalog written by Patrick Taylor of Highlands, North Carolina with forwards by, Sallie Taylor, Janet Koplos, and Don Pilcher. Price includes mailing within the United States, other mailings will have to be calculated before purchasing. All copies are signed. Thank you very much for looking at the pots to be posted soon.

    RETROSPECTIVE CATALOG-TOM TURNER: A PASSION FOR PORCELAIN-2014

    $55.00

    1 in stock

    Show NFS

    1 is a small paddled vase from ISU from 1967, lip is from seeing a Paul Soldner workshop.

    2 is a large  oval stoneware vase made at ISU in 1968, made without a base, moved oval onto a slab foot, from seeing a Bill Farrell workshop. Form and surface Ab Ex influence. It was in a show at the Evansville Indiana Art Museum in 1968.

    3 was made at ISU in 1968 just prior to getting drafted. It was in “YOUNG AMERICANS 69” a juried show by the AMERICAN CRAFT COUNCIL which toured the US for 2 years.

    Show NFS

    Then came the Army, drafted out of graduate school at Illinois State. I was assigned to Special Services and worked at Craft Shop #4 at Fort Jackson, SC and taught Ceramics, Jewelry, Enameling, Lapidary, Leather, Painting, and we had Photography. I also worked at the Columbia Museum of Art and built kilns in Columbia so that I could high fire my work.

    1 is a porcelain plate made at Ft. Jackson and fired in Jon Formo’s kiln in Columbia, SC  which I helped build.

    2 is a salt glazed stoneware piece made while I was still in the Army and fired in my salt kiln near Cayce, SC.

    3 is another stoneware salt glazed piece from that kiln

    4 is a test to prove to myself that salt glaze was clear and dependent upon the body, slips, glazes, or vapor for color, cobalt was added to the porcelain.

    5,6,7,8,9 is that kiln built of scrounged material. The before and after photos show a couple of these pots.

    10 is a large coil thrown stoneware salt glazed vase with strong Don Reitz influence made at Cayce, SC prior to going to Clemson to teach.

    Show NFS

    1 is from ISU 1966 and a glaze blend test of Red Art and wood ash.

    2 is from ISU 1967, unglazed, slip application influenced by a film on Onda, Japan.

    3 is  salt glazed vase from my first kiln in my parents back yard in Morris, Illinois in 1967

    4 & 5 are that first salt kiln 1967.

    Show NFS

    I had been invited to go to Clemson University to set up a Ceramic Art program in The College of Architecture and went there in 1971. This enabled me to continue research on a Copper Red  Salt glaze  which I ended up calling Copper Red Vapor Salt Glaze.

    1 is an early attempt where the copper carbonate was put into a porcelaneous stoneware body and salt glazed in 1972 at Clemson University. Copper from this pot vaporized off onto #2 and that proved my initial theory that a Copper Red Vapor Salt Glaze was possible.

    2 had no glaze or slips on it and received vaporized copper from pot #1. Gold luster was applied after the salt glaze. At this point it was evident that I needed more subtle forms for the glaze to dance on. Alterations and handles were minimized. In John Conrad’s book, “Contemporary Ceramic Techniques”, 1979

    3 shows the more subtle form relying solely on the firing when I started adding the copper carbonate to the salt. Tin was also vaporized. It is in Ceramics Monthly, February, 1974.

    4 was the epitome of the Copper Red Vapor Salt Glaze over Blue Porcelain creating a purple Salt Glaze-1974. It was exhibited in “Southeastern Invitational Crafts Exhibition” 1974, and Studio Potter, Vol. 8, #1, 1979.

    5,6, and 7 show rubble experimental kilns at Clemson and my high alumina research kiln at Liberty, SC

    Summer of 1986

    I had a great time at Illinois State as Visiting Artist, finishing up late spring 1986. My life was in storage in Akron, Ohio and I decided to move to the Columbus, Ohio area. After much hunting  I found 5  acres with a dilapidated house and barn near Delaware, Ohio. I bought the property and moved my life to Peachblow Road and founded Peachblow Pottery. Peachblow is a term used in the glass industry to mean copper reds and pinks. So a Copper Red Potter ended up on Copper Red Road. I spent 19 years there constantly improving the land and buildings. I once again converted a barn into a studio, rebuilt my car kiln from Akron, set up my filter press and continued making Tom Turner Georgia Porcelain.

    TEST TILES-TEST TILES-TEST TILES.

    Oilspot glazes are best held at the end to let the bubbles go down. BUT, if you go to 9 and hold it, the melt continues. So I decided to drop 2 cones and hold one hour and it worked perfectly. If you click on Electric Kiln Schedule below and then on the link, it shows my firing schedules.

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